laughhard:

See this hat? Tis’ my cat.

laughhard:

See this hat? Tis’ my cat.

(via exceptionallyaustin)


marilynmenascott:

🎶you shoot me down, but I won’t fall, I LOVE BRONZE TITANIUUUUUUMMM🎶 No, but seriously, bronze Ti is gaining popularity and it should, cause it’s rad. We love it mixed with Tiger’s Eye!

marilynmenascott:

🎶you shoot me down, but I won’t fall, I LOVE BRONZE TITANIUUUUUUMMM🎶 No, but seriously, bronze Ti is gaining popularity and it should, cause it’s rad. We love it mixed with Tiger’s Eye!

(via safepiercing)


Every day is an exercise in patience.


allthecanadianpolitics:

Family of missing First Nation teen fears for her safety

Members of a Winnipeg family say they’re afraid for the safety of 15-year-old Pretty Plume Cobiness.
According to a post on Facebook, Cobiness was last seen leaving Studio 393 in Portage Place wearing a black T-shirt with a white logo. The First Nation teen is approximately five feet six inches tall, weighs about 170 pounds, and has long brown hair.
Her brother, Pete Cobiness, says no one in her family has heard from her since Saturday. 
"You never know and if you’re in the city, that’s what really worries me — some crazy stuff goes on out here," he told CBC News on Tuesday.
Winnipeg police confirm that Cobiness was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 16.
Her disappearance came just one day before the body of another 15-year-old girl, Tina Fontaine, was discovered in the Red River in Winnipeg.

This is tragic. ANOTHER missing aboriginal girl in Canada. Not even a day after Tina Fontaine was found, murdered.
Please signal boost!

allthecanadianpolitics:

Family of missing First Nation teen fears for her safety

Members of a Winnipeg family say they’re afraid for the safety of 15-year-old Pretty Plume Cobiness.

According to a post on Facebook, Cobiness was last seen leaving Studio 393 in Portage Place wearing a black T-shirt with a white logo. The First Nation teen is approximately five feet six inches tall, weighs about 170 pounds, and has long brown hair.

Her brother, Pete Cobiness, says no one in her family has heard from her since Saturday. 

"You never know and if you’re in the city, that’s what really worries me — some crazy stuff goes on out here," he told CBC News on Tuesday.

Winnipeg police confirm that Cobiness was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 16.

Her disappearance came just one day before the body of another 15-year-old girl, Tina Fontaine, was discovered in the Red River in Winnipeg.

This is tragic. ANOTHER missing aboriginal girl in Canada. Not even a day after Tina Fontaine was found, murdered.

Please signal boost!

(via shychemist)



My parents sent me a picture of their kitchen renovation

My parents sent me a picture of their kitchen renovation

(via lyxdelsic)



In the city, when someone knocks on your door, it’s a neighbor, a Jehovah’s witness, or girl scout cookies.

In the country, when someone knocks on your door and you weren’t expecting anyone you get the shotgun because bitch I saw that movie and they all died at the end.



thickneck:

misskittystryker:

orocarni-mountains:

particlecollisions:

particlecollisions:

Self defence sprays that are legal to carry and use in the United Kingdom

Image 1: Farbgel
Image 2: StoppaRed

I’ve seen a lot of people (mostly women, for reasons which may be obvious) speaking about being worried when going out, be it alone or even with friends, both in the day and at night. I know that a lot of female friends of mine carry around a can of antiperspirant or a pot of pepper to use if they’re ever attacked. What I know a lot of people don’t realise is that there are products out there which work in a violent situation and help in catching the assailant for the best part of a week afterwards.

Known as ‘criminal identifiers’, these sprays are brightly coloured dyes which can be sprayed in the face of an attacker. Unlike things such as CS or Pepper sprays, criminal identifier sprays are legal in the UK.

There’s a few available on the market, with farbgel and Mace’s Stoppared being the mostly highly recommended.

What these sprays do is release a sticky, brightly coloured dye. It’s difficult to wipe away and stains the skin a bright red colour. No matter how hard an attacker might try to remove it from their skin and clothing, the staining typically lasts for around a week and doesn’t even start to fade until after a few days have passed.

Unlike CS and Pepper sprays (which, again, aren’t legal in the UK) criminal identifier sprays don’t cause irritation or pain to an attacker. Instead, they expand and clog up the area sprayed with a kind of sticky foam that’s difficult to wipe away. It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.

Each can of the sprays costs around £10 each, though it may be cheaper when buying multiple canisters and if you shop around.

FarbGel 

StoppaRed UV Personal Attack Self-Defence Spray by Mace

This is an original post, but I’ve released it into the public domain. It can be shared, altered, reposted in whole or in part with no need for attribution (though obviously I would appreciate it!)

cc @misandry-mermaid

It should give you enough time to escape and report someone whose face resembles a baboon’s arse to the police.

That’s brilliant

omg yes!

UM why arent pepper sprays legal in the uk

(via titanpilotwannbe)




This gal!  Rockin a flat disk nostril screw from @industrialstrength. Love it!  So glad she decided to get pierced!

#nostril #nostrilscrew #nosescrew #nose #nosepiercing #nostrilpiercing #nosestud #bodypiercing #bodyjewelry #facialpiercings #piercednose #piercing #piercings #industrialstrength #piercedbywednesday #tothepointbodypiercingandtattoo #collegestation #bryancollegestation #bcs #aggieland #texas  (at To The Point Body Piercing & Tattoo)

This gal! Rockin a flat disk nostril screw from @industrialstrength. Love it! So glad she decided to get pierced!

#nostril #nostrilscrew #nosescrew #nose #nosepiercing #nostrilpiercing #nosestud #bodypiercing #bodyjewelry #facialpiercings #piercednose #piercing #piercings #industrialstrength #piercedbywednesday #tothepointbodypiercingandtattoo #collegestation #bryancollegestation #bcs #aggieland #texas (at To The Point Body Piercing & Tattoo)


donaldsterlingsshriveledpenis:

If you think eating healthy is cheap you either live with your parents or have never actually been to a grocery store

(via fucked-up-sketches)


thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?August 17, 2014
Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .
Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.
Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.
But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.
Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.
While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.
Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.
After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.
Those never came.
Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.
The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.
In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.
But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.
For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.
After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.
Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.
But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.
Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.
Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.
Source
Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!
Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan NettlesSunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?
August 17, 2014

Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .

Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.

Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.

But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.

Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.

While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.

Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.

After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.

Those never came.

Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.

The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.

In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.

But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.

For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.

After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.

Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.

But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.

Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.

Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.

Source

Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!

Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan Nettles
Sunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.

Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD

(via titanpilotwannbe)


grubsludge:

funk-dabble:

littleleahlamb2k14:

grubsludge:

bury me in armor so I’ll be ready for the skeleton war

image

ready

why is his fricking chest uncovered? that’s ppor planning right there

what are you gonna do?

stab a skeleton in the heart?

(via titanpilotwannbe)